Interpack 2017

Treofan turns to phthalate-free packaging films and mineral oil barriers

By Jenny Eagle contact

- Last updated on GMT

Treofan has started to offer its customers phthalate-free packaging films on request using phthalate-free base polymers in the extrusion process.

The BOPP film manufacturer already makes standard films with a low phthalate content of  0.001% (< 10 mg/kg). By comparison, PVCs (polyvinyl chloride​) have concentrations of up to 30% but it claims demand is growing.

€7.5m coater

Jürgen Schischko, technical service director, Treofan, said the use of phthalates in plastics is currently under discussion and demand is growing in the food industry for materials completely free from these chemicals.

The company recently announced plans to install a €7.5m ($8.2m) coater at its factory in Battipaglia, Italy, scheduled to start operations in the second quarter of 2018.

The line is designed to deliver an annual volume of 4,000 metric tons of specialty film with a variety of coatings, installed by Swiss supplier Bobst.

Trefoan will produce its existing portfolio products from this plant as well as films with integrated mineral oil​ barriers.

It can also produce single and double-side coatings with different individual materials.

Premium sector

Schischko said its expansion with the coater machinery broadens the company’s opportunities for developing new packaging and towards expanding its position in the premium segment.

It already runs a coater at its facility in Terni, Italy, which produces about 10,000 metric tons of coated film per year.

The new plant is expected to increase its production capacity for coated film by 40%.

Global demand for coated films is growing continually due to a number of trends, such as increasing requirements for flexible packaging to include barrier effects and to keep the packaged products fresh for longer​,” said Schischko.

Trefoan recently launched a GPR 20 packaging​ film with a matte film effect for potato chips, cookies and chocolate in response to consumer demand for retro-look packaging. 

Schischko said market demand for packaging with a ‘retro’ look is growing disproportionately in many different areas, from snacks to cosmetics.